Job Outlook for:

Weighers, Measurers, Checkers, and Samplers, Recordkeeping


This Job Outlook and Career Forecast covers:

Material recording, scheduling, dispatching, and distribution occupations, except postal workers; Measurers; Samplers; Checkers; Clerks 


Highlights For Weighers, Measurers, Checkers, and Samplers, Recordkeeping

  • Many jobs are at the entry level and do not require more than a high school diploma.
  • Employment of weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers is expected to decline because of the increased use of automated equipment that performs the function of these workers.

Nature of the Work For Weighers, Measurers, Checkers, and Samplers, Recordkeeping

Weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers weigh, measure, and check materials, supplies, and equipment in order to keep accurate records.

Most of their duties are clerical. Using either manual or automated data-processing systems, they verify the quantity, quality, and overall value of the items they are responsible for and check the condition of items purchased, sold, or produced against records, bills, invoices, or receipts. They check the items to ensure the accuracy of the recorded data. They prepare reports on warehouse inventory levels and on the use of parts. Weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers also check for any defects in the items and record the severity of the defects they find.

These workers use weight scales, counting devices, tally sheets, and calculators to get and record information about products. They usually move objects to and from the scales with a handtruck or forklift. They issue receipts for products when needed or requested.

Work environment. Weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers work in a wide variety of businesses, institutions, and industries. Some work in warehouses, stockrooms, or shipping and receiving rooms that may not be temperature controlled. Others may spend time in cold storage rooms or on loading platforms that are exposed to the weather.


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Job Training / Job Education Requirements For
Weighers, Measurers, Checkers, and Samplers, Recordkeeping

Most jobs do not require more than a high school diploma. However preference is given to applicants familiar with computers.

Education and training. Many weigher, measurer, checker, and sampler jobs are entry level and do not require more than a high school diploma or a GED, its equivalent.

Other qualifications. Employers prefer to hire individuals familiar with computers. Applicants who have specific job-related experience may also be preferred. Typing, filing, recordkeeping, and other clerical skills are important.

Advancement. Advancement opportunities vary with the place of employment.

Employment

Weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers held about 79,000 jobs in 2006. Their employment is spread across many industries. Retail trade accounted for 14 percent of those jobs, manufacturing accounted for about 22 percent, and wholesale trade employed another 18 percent.

Job Outlook / Job Forecast

Despite rapid declines in overall employment due primarily to automation, job opportunities should arise from the need to replace workers who leave the labor force or transfer to other occupations.

Employment change. Employment of weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers is expected to decline rapidly by 11 percent from 2006 through 2016 because of the increased use of automated equipment that now performs the function of these workers.

Job prospects. Despite employment declines, job opportunities should arise from the need to replace workers who leave the labor force or transfer to other occupations.

Job Demand Forecast

Projections data from the National Employment Matrix
Occupational title
SOC Code
Employment, 2006
Projected
employment,
2016
Change, 2006-16
Detailed statistics
Number
Percent

Weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers, recordkeeping

43-5111
79,000
70,000
-9,000
-11
PDF
zipped XLS

    NOTE: Data in this table are rounded. See the discussion of the employment projections table in the Handbook introductory chapter on Occupational Information Included in the Handbook.

Earnings / Compensation

Median wage-and-salary earnings of weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers in May 2006 were $12.20. The middle 50 percent earned between $9.66 and $15.83. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $8.03, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $19.78.

These workers usually receive the same benefits as most other workers. If uniforms are required, employers generally provide them or offer an allowance to purchase them.

Related Occupations

Other workers who determine and document characteristics of materials or equipment include cargo and freight agents; production, planning, and expediting clerks; shipping, receiving, and traffic clerks; stock clerks and order fillers; and procurement clerks.

Additional Information

Information about job opportunities may be obtained from local employers and local offices of the State employment service.


     

Jobs and Job Outlook for Weighers, Measurers, Checkers, and Samplers, Recordkeeping

ONET Codes: 43-5111.00

SeqNum: 267



 

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